ACLS Medications Review: Amiodarone

Learn a quick overview, the correct dosage, and additional notes on the ACLS drug Amiodarone.


Overview:

Amiodarone is an antiarrhythmic drug used to treat V-Fib or pulseless VT unresponsive to shock delivery, CPR, and a vasopressor. It can also be used to treat recurrent Hemodynamically Unstable Ventricular Tachycardia, Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy, and Supraventricular Tachyarrhythmias.

  

Amiodarone can be considered the first-line antiarrhythmic agent given in cardiac arrest because it has shown the ability to increase short-term survival, improve the rate of ROSC, and increase the likelihood of hospital admission.

  

Dosage:

The first dose of Amiodarone when being used to treat VT/V-Fib is 300 mg via IV/IO push. If needed, a second dose of 150 mg IV/IO push may be administered.

  

When treating Tachycardia/VT, 150 mg IV/IO should be delivered over 10 minutes, with continuous infusions of 1 mg/min IV for 6 hours, and 0.5 mg/min IV for the next 18 hours.

  

Additional Notes on Amiodarone Usage:

- Amiodarone should be administered with extreme caution due to the fact that is associated with toxicity and serious side-effects

  

- The rapid infusion can cause hypotension

  

- Significant hypotension can occur if cumulative dosing exceeds 2.2 grams in a 24-hour period

  

- Do not administer Amiodarone with other drugs that may prolong QT interval


For a brief review of all the ACLS medications you should be familiar with, check out this short video. It acts as a great visual reference that will help you study more efficiently and effectively. If you are interested in obtaining your ACLS Recertification online, click the button below that corresponds to your required course in order to learn more!

  

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